Friday, February 24, 2012

A Shiitake first: Four worst quotes candidates... in a single article!

I have not seen such a short article contain so many terribly bad quotes. I don't know the reporter picked these clowns on purpose. I will highlight the offending comments below:

http://www.springfieldnewssun.com/pursuit-of-ohio-sex-offenders-falls-short-1331612.html


Pursuit of Ohio sex offenders falls short

Most counties aren’t using available funds to get those who fled Ohio.

By Jim Otte, WHIO-TV
Updated 7:54 AM Tuesday, February 21, 2012
I don't know why Google posted this sideways, but maybe it's because Lenhart's brain apparently thinks sideways.
Shelby County Sheriff John Lenhart said authorities across the nation too often take the attitude that once offenders cross state lines they are someone else’s problem.
When these people are out of compliance they are hunting your kids and your grandkids to sexually assault them,” Lenhart said.
[Comment: Of course this is a complete fabrication-- a study conducted by Jill Levenson confirmed failure to register does not equate to higher recidivism.]

They do not want us to find them and that is part of the problem why they move around so much,” said Det. Cori Steiner of the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office.
[Comment: Actually, it has more to do with being targeted by people simply because of being listed on the registry. The registry should be abolished]

Lee said if authorities do not return those offenders who violate registration laws, it will only mean more problems. “They play huge games with the system,” said Bill Taylor, senior inspector for the U.S. Marshals Service. “They know how many days to live in a certain spot before they have to tell Ohio that they’ve moved.”
[Comment: I don't see being forced to move constantly is "playing games." I would consider knowing the registration rules a prerequisite to living by them, don't you think?]

Tiffany Kemp, program director for Shelby County Victim Services, said when sex offenders feel they have escaped the eye of local law enforcement, they begin searching for victims. They could spend as much as three to five years gaining the trust of a neighboring family.

[Comment: See the Failure to Register Study above. ]

It must be one monumental feat to squeeze so many fallacies into one little spot.

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